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You have pain in your back because you aren’t doing the right things your body needs. You need to exercise just a little bit and you need to drink plenty of water. You have to pay attetion to your body an the signs of back pain and don’t ignore what you feel.

Fitness Magazine lists the following as common signs of back pain and easy solutions:

1. You’re a screen queen.

Nine hours — that’s how long the average person spends hunched over or slouched in front of a screen each day. A Temple University study suggested that increased texting on our latest tech obsessions — smartphones and tablets — is creating more aches and pains in our shoulders, necks, and backs. “It’s important to take breaks, do neck exercises, and occasionally hold your phone or tablet out in front of you,” says Deborah Venesy, MD, a doctor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Spine Health. For a simple neck reliever, hold your head for 10 seconds in each of the following positions: forward, back, left, and right. Repeat this five times a day.

2. You sleep on your stomach.

The bedtime belly flop places pressure on joints and muscles, but sleeping on your side or back keeps your spine elongated and neutral. If you must snooze on your tummy, slide a thin pillow under your hips to alleviate pressure on disks, ligaments and muscles. Regardless of your slumber sweet spot, go with a medium mattress (check the manufacturer’s scale of firmness and opt for one in the middle range) and a pillow that keeps your head in line with your spine. Research in the Lancet found that people with chronic low-back pain who snoozed on medium mattresses had fewer aches after three months than those who slept on firm beds. So take a tip from Goldilocks: Your bed should be not too hard (this wreaks havoc on hips and shoulders) and not too soft (this puts your back and joints out of whack).

3. You’re an emotional mess.

It’s no secret that struggling with pain can take a toll on your mental health, and studies have shown that people with back pain are more likely to be depressed. But now doctors are discovering that the reverse may be true as well: In research from the University of Alberta in Canada, people with major depression were four times as likely to develop disabling low-back and neck pain. Some scientists believe that poor coping skills related to depression, such as withdrawing or avoiding problems, may trigger the release of the stress hormone cortisol, causing back and shoulder muscles to tense up and spasm. “The result can be a devastating cycle of chronic pain and depression,” Dr. Moyad says. Antidepressants as well as mood enhancers like exercise, meditation, yoga, and deep breathing can help ease stress and make you feel better.

See more reasons here.

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